From: Clément on
On May 20, 7:10 am, Futbolmetrix wrote:
> On May 19, 3:48 pm, Jesus Petry wrote:
>
>
>
> >  That's not the only weird stuff about them. They are in the second
> > flight of São Paulo State League and almost fell to the third this
> > year. And besides Santos, who are a special case, they are the only
> > League champions to come from a state countryside city.
>
> Not that I quite understand what this means, but I pick Guarani.

Every former Brazilian champion is from a state capital, except for
Guarani (1978 champions) and Santos (2004 champions).


Abraço,

Luiz Mello
From: Lleo on
On 20 maio, 08:43, Clément <lcmello.lis...(a)terra.com.br> wrote:
> On May 20, 7:10 am, Futbolmetrix wrote:
>
> > On May 19, 3:48 pm, Jesus Petry wrote:
>
> > >  That's not the only weird stuff about them. They are in the second
> > > flight of São Paulo State League and almost fell to the third this
> > > year. And besides Santos, who are a special case, they are the only
> > > League champions to come from a state countryside city.
>
> > Not that I quite understand what this means, but I pick Guarani.
>
> Every former Brazilian champion is from a state capital, except for
> Guarani (1978 champions) and Santos (2004 champions).

This is becoming a trend at the second level too. Since 1988, only 5
out of 20 champions do not come from a capital city. And of these 5, 4
were before 2000 (Inter de Limeira'88, Bragantino'89, Juventude'94,
União São João'96, Criciúma'02).

I picked 1988 because it was since around that year that the first
division was trimmed to a reasonable amount of teams. Before then,
winning the second level meant you'd have 40+ clubs ahead of you;
that's third division proportions nowadays!

--
Lléo
From: Clément on
On May 25, 12:29 am, Lleo wrote:
> On 20 maio, 08:43, Clément wrote:
>
> > On May 20, 7:10 am, Futbolmetrix wrote:
>
> > > On May 19, 3:48 pm, Jesus Petry wrote:
>
> > > >  That's not the only weird stuff about them. They are in the second
> > > > flight of São Paulo State League and almost fell to the third this
> > > > year. And besides Santos, who are a special case, they are the only
> > > > League champions to come from a state countryside city.
>
> > > Not that I quite understand what this means, but I pick Guarani.
>
> > Every former Brazilian champion is from a state capital, except for
> > Guarani (1978 champions) and Santos (2004 champions).
>
> This is becoming a trend at the second level too. Since 1988, only 5
> out of 20 champions do not come from a capital city. And of these 5, 4
> were before 2000 (Inter de Limeira'88, Bragantino'89, Juventude'94,
> União São João'96, Criciúma'02).

It makes sense, as the progressive trimming of Brazilian football
tiers to viable numbers of clubs (and the overall field balance) made
it common for traditional clubs from capital cities to be relegated.

Remarkably, the last 5 (and 6 of the last 7) Serie B champions are
former Brazilian Champions.


Abraço,

Luiz Mello